If you are on Long Island, you are aware of the recent storm we were hit with. After 80-90 mile per hour winds, you may have noticed the damage caused to the trees and plants. If not, take a look at the featured image above so that you can see what wind/salt burn looks like.

 

This is called “wind desiccation” and it occurs when sweeping winds draw out moisture from the leaves and stem tissue. The wind literally sucks the water out of the plants as if it were a vacuum. This occurs quicker than the stems can replenish the water within them.

 

After receiving such harsh treatment, the plants are then exposed to the sun and easily burn due to being in such a dried out state. When you go outside, take a look around and try to spot the wind damage. You’ll be surprised at how obvious the burn is and yet how few of us notice the injuries to the trees around us.

 

If you have a garden or trees on your property, you most certainly saw the damage done to your plants. Unfortunately, sometimes nature is not so friendly to our little plantation friends. All we can do is continue to care for them and allow them to heal. Should you happen to know when such a storm is coming, certain trees can be wrapped in an attempt to protect them from wind/sand burn. Usually after some time, the plants will recover on their own. Wind burn is very stressful on a plant. They usually end up curling their leaves under to try and protect themselves. This reaction is called “clawing”.

 

This damage is certainly more detrimental during the colder seasons. If the ground or soil happened to be frozen, then the likelihood of survival of the tree or plant is far greater. In fact, the younger the tree, the higher the chance of damage. Older and more established trees are deeply rooted in the ground and are able to absorb more water for replenishment.